It’s probably obvious from the fact that this blog exists Joanna and I enjoy taking the occasional “sentimental journey to renew old memories.” We love old movies and classic cars (to look at, having neither the money nor the mechanical expertise to make them a hobby), and our home and my office boast such historic “treasures” as a 1930s cabinet radio, a 1950s console television, old trunks, black-and-white photos, and hundred-year-old books and magazines. Some might suggest that my wardrobe offers further evidence of my appreciation for old things.

One of my favorite wedding anniversaries was one of the quietest (our 31st), for which my wife and I spent most of the evening sitting side by side on the couch going through photo albums of our life together. I fear that the shoot-everything-with-your-phone-and-save-it-to-Facebook/Instagram/WordPress young marrieds of today will miss out on some things that we older folks now appreciate.

Doris Day sang along with Les Brown and His Band of Renown for the first hit version of “Sentimental Journey” back in 1945. The song became a jazz standard, recorded by Rosemary Clooney (George’s aunt), Ella Fitzgeraldthe Platters, Ray PriceSheena Easton and Ringo Starr, among many others. “Sentimental Journey” was one of a number of hits for Day, who released 31 albums; others included “Secret Love,” “Dream a Little Dream of Me,” “Autumn Leaves,” “I’ll Never Stop Loving You,” “It’s Magic” and “Tea for Two.”

Day probably is better known today as a movie star than as a singer. Appearing in 39 films and the biggest box-office star in America during the early 1960s, her films included “Calamity Jane,” “Pillow Talk,” “Please Don’t Eat the Daisies,” “The Pajama Game,” “That Touch of Mink,” Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Man Who Knew Too Much” (which introduced Academy Award-winning song “Que Sera, Sera“), and “It Happened to Jane” (full movie here). Day, now 90 years old and a one-time “mystery guest” on “What’s My Line,” also had her own somewhat odd television show and became a noted animal activist. You can see two documentaries about her life on YouTube, here and here.

“Sentimental Journey” lyrics here, with a 1985 video that reunites Day, Brown and some members of the band — followed by a 1945 version and photos — below.

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